Author Blogs

Telemachus Press, LLC is pleased to offer a venue for its author’s blog postings and other writings. This portion of our website is automatically fed with material provided by our authors who are third parties and are not employed by Telemachus Press, LLC. This externally provided commentary and any opinions contained therein are solely those of the author and not necessarily supported by Telemachus Press, LLC or any of its employees or subcontractors.

29
The best predictor of our future behavior is our past action. ...

Read More of Do What I Say, NOT What I Do!...

[Read More...]

28
I wrote my first book when I was eight years old. It was a book about the weather and it was called, of course, The Book of Weather. I took construction paper and drew the sun and wind and clouds, wrote about lightning and thunder and fastened the pages between two pieces of cardboard taken from my father’s new button-down work shirts. I covered the cardboard with green and yellow wallpaper that had bright and bubbly orange flowers dancing along it. The wallpaper had been left over from decorating our 1970’s Long Island kitchen. I was pleased with my book but nothing made me prouder than when the librarian placed it in my elementary school library. I visited it every day. I don’t recall anyone checking out my book, or if it was given its own listing in the card catalogue or even a Dewey decimal number, but I didn’t care. There it was on the shelves. My book. I was a writer. And a writer I was determined to be until the day came when practicality usurped my ......

Read More of Alchemy...

[Read More...]

28
I have never met Michelangelo. I have never had a conversation with him nor heard his voice. I have learned about his life from his artwork, his poetry and his letters. Yet I feel I know him better than many of my closest friends. As a writer, I yearn for creative talent to equal his. As a student of the Italian renaissance, I am fascinated by one of its geniuses. From a spiritual perspective, there is a deep connection between Michelangelo & me. Why? When I look at David, his famous sculpture, I feel powerful. When I see his Pieta, the sculpture of Mary mourning the loss of her son, I know unconditional love. And when I look at the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, his magnificent portrayal of life’s creation, I am certain his gift of creativity comes from a higher power. And therein lies the origin of my obsession. He is not of this earth. There is no equal to his creative prowess. That he continues to touch others and me after 500 years is nothing short of amazing. Alt......

Read More of Michelangelo & Me...

[Read More...]

22
I am the author of five novels and am writing this post to examine one year selling my books on Amazon to see what I did right and what I did wrong in my quest to build a fan base, and to help other independent authors. To begin my unofficial scientific experiment, I have donned a lab coat and a Sherlock Holmes’ cap, test tubes are brimming over with white, dense bubbles in my laboratory, and I have formulated the following question: As a self-published author, how is it best to utilize Amazon to sell/giveaway the most e-books possible? In doing my background research and constructing my hypothesis, I am considering the following: 1.   My published e-books, including the genre, number of Amazon reviews and overall ratings. 2.   My e-book sales from May 1, 2013 until May 31, 2014, as well as refunded e-books, free promotions, the prices of my e-books, royalties received, the Kindle Match (KM) program (which began January 1, 2014 and where if readers buy the pa......

Read More of My Year On Amazon...

[Read More...]

19
John Finkbiner (@bamafanWH) just sent me a recent New York Times article on Verbizing (or, verbing as the Times calls it). It is worth reading. Find it at: nyti.ms/XByB6o. Steve ...

Read More of New York Times on Verbizing...

[Read More...]

19
I’m a voracious reader. I usually have three or four books going at one time — sometimes even more —and dip into each most nights when I settle down to read, taking on a chapter or two from each for that evening, but then settling into one that will be my last book for the night, and reading it for however much time I have until I go to sleep. Although I write mystery novels, I don’t limit my reading to this genre. I need balance in my reading diet. Specifically, I need variety. So on any given night I might be found reading a chapter in a mystery or other crime novel, a chapter of history, a chapter of biography, a collection of poetry, a literary novel, or a volume of essays. The variety keeps my reading fresh and lively for me, challenges my brain by requiring differing thought processes, and, in general, informs the content and quality of my own writing. ...

Read More of What I Choose to Read and Why...

[Read More...]

19
It never fails to amaze me what wondrous written works can be (and have been) created in the English language using only 26 letters that we arrange and rearrange into an unlimited number of words. Together with a handful of punctuation marks, some structure (such as paragraphs, scenes, and dialogue) and the judicious use of white space, a skilled writer, using the raw tools of 26 letters available to all of us, can convey the wonders of story and exposition. ...

Read More of It takes only 26 Letters...

[Read More...]

19
One of my pet peeves -- one I fall prey to engaging in myself -- is our tendency to verbize, to turn nouns into verbs to shortcut our speech (There! I just verbized using the noun ‘shortcut’ as an active verb!) Thus, we do not make a telephone call or send an e-mail; we telephone someone or e-mail them. ...

Read More of Verbizing Drives Me Nuts! ...

[Read More...]

19
As writers we strive to ensure that the words we write, the phrases we use, and the scenes we create accurately reflect our intended meaning and are not easily susceptible to misinterpretation by our readers. As readers, we want to know that the words we read mean what the writer intended and what we think they mean, and that they are not subject to other interpretations. Where these goals seem to be neglected, sometimes with humorous results, is in the world of signs. For example, I recently saw this highway sign as I drove home from Washington's Dulles International Airport: "All trucks must exit next two exits". I thought: If I were driving a truck, I would not be happy being required to exit the highway at the next exit, then required to get back onto the highway, and then leave the highway once again to fulfill the sign's mandate of exiting twice. ...

Read More of Sign Language -- Writers and Readers Beware...

[Read More...]

19
Now that I'm working on the sequel to MANDARIN YELLOW, I appreciate how useful and important using a beat sheet is. For the first time I truly have an overview of my book and am able to shift around chapters at will within the context of my view (literally and figuratively) of the whole. This has been immeasurably useful to me....

Read More of Writers: The Value of Using a Beat Sheet...

[Read More...]

Page 8 of 9First   Previous   3  4  5  6  7  [8]  9  Next   Last